Victoria Policy Legacy – Mini Rail Picnic

Published

16

Oct

2017

Victoria Police Legacy

On the 15th October the Box Hill Mini Rail team and the Rotary Club of Balwyn held a picnic for the younger police legatees at the Box Hill Miniature Railway. We also had an MFB Firetruck, face painter and senior officers from Vic Police attend. More importantly we saw 30 timid kids arrive and feel the support of community around them – as the day progressed we all saw their confidence blossom. Surviving parents and carers themselves relaxed and shared in the joy with the kids.

Victoria Police Legacy supports members of the police family who have lost a partner who is a serving or retired sworn member of Victoria Police, Protective Services Officer or recruit in training.

 

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